Central Library, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
केंद्रीय पुस्तकालय, भारतीय प्रौद्योगिकी संस्थान दिल्ली

Smart internal stimulus-responsive nanocarriers for drug and gene delivery / Mahdi Karimi, Parham Sahandi Zangabad, Amir Ghasemi and Michael R. Hamblin.

By: Karimi, Mahdi (Scientist) [author.]Contributor(s): Ghasemi, Amir [author.] | Hamblin, Michael R [author.] | Zangabad, Parham Sahandi [author.] | Morgan & Claypool Publishers [publisher.] | Institute of Physics (Great Britain) [publisher.]Material type: TextTextSeries: IOP concise physics | IOP (Series). Release 2.Publisher: San Rafael [California] (40 Oak Drive, San Rafael, CA, 94903, USA) : Morgan & Claypool Publishers, [2015]Distributor: Bristol [England] (Temple Circus, Temple Way, Bristol BS1 6HG, UK) : IOP Publishing, [2015]Description: 1 online resource (various pagings) : illustrations (some color)Content type: text Media type: electronic Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781681742571; 9781681742595Subject(s): Nanomedicine | Drug delivery systems | Gene therapy | Nanomedicine -- methods | Drug Delivery Systems | Drug Therapy -- methods | Gene Therapy -- methods | Nanostructures -- therapeutic use | TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING / Biomedical | Biomedical EngineeringAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 615.1 LOC classification: R857.N34 | .K3775 2015ebNLM classification: QT 36.5Online resources: Click here to access online Also available in print.
Contents:
Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Author biography -- 1. Introduction
2. pH-sensitive micro/nanocarriers -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. pH-sensitive nanocarriers -- 2.3. pH-sensitive micro/nanocarrier drug release mechanisms -- 2.4. Challenges and applications
3. Enzyme-responsive nanocarriers -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Immobilized biocatalysts -- 3.3. Enzyme-responsive materials in drug delivery -- 3.4. Common enzyme-responsive materials
4. Redox-responsive micro/nanocarriers -- 4.1. Redox-responsive nano drug/gene delivery systems -- 4.2. Nanogels -- 4.3. Polymersomes -- 4.4. Nanocapsules -- 4.5. Micelles
5. Biomolecule-sensitive nanocarriers -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate-responsive -- 5.3. Glucose-responsive -- 5.4. DNA-responsive -- 5.5. Reactive oxygen species-responsive -- 5.6. Glutathione-responsive -- 5.7. Receptor-responsive -- 5.8. Cytoplasm-responsive
6. Dual/multi-stimuli-sensitive nanocarriers -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Dual stimuli-based delivery systems -- 6.3. Triple stimuli-based delivery systems -- 7. Future perspectives and the global drug delivery systems market.
Abstract: The concept of smart drug delivery vehicles involves designing and preparing a nanostructure (or microstructure) that can be loaded with a cargo. This can be a therapeutic drug, a contrast agent for imaging, or a nucleic acid for gene therapy. The nanocarrier serves to protect the cargo from degradation by enzymes in the body, to enhance the solubility of insoluble drugs, to extend the circulation half-life, and to enhance its penetration and accumulation at the target site. Importantly, smart nanocarriers can be designed to be responsive to a specific stimulus, so that the cargo is only released or activated when desired. In this volume we cover smart nanocarriers that respond to internal stimuli that are intrinsic to the target site. These stimuli are specific to the cell type, tissue or organ type, or to the disease state (cancer, infection, inflammation etc). pH-responsive nanostructures can be used for cargo release in acidic endosomal compartments, in the lower pH of tumors, and for specific oral delivery either to the stomach or intestine. Nanocarriers can be designed to be substrates of a wide-range of enzymes that are over-expressed at disease sites. Oxidation and reduction reactions can be taken advantage of in smart nanocarriers by judicious molecular design. Likewise, nanocarriers can be designed to respond to a range of specific biomolecules that may occur at the target site. In this volume we also cover dual and multi-responsive systems that combine stimuli that could be either internal or external.
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"Version: 20151101"--Title page verso.

"A Morgan & Claypool publication as part of IOP Concise Physics"--Title page verso.

Includes bibliographical references.

Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Author biography -- 1. Introduction

2. pH-sensitive micro/nanocarriers -- 2.1. Introduction -- 2.2. pH-sensitive nanocarriers -- 2.3. pH-sensitive micro/nanocarrier drug release mechanisms -- 2.4. Challenges and applications

3. Enzyme-responsive nanocarriers -- 3.1. Introduction -- 3.2. Immobilized biocatalysts -- 3.3. Enzyme-responsive materials in drug delivery -- 3.4. Common enzyme-responsive materials

4. Redox-responsive micro/nanocarriers -- 4.1. Redox-responsive nano drug/gene delivery systems -- 4.2. Nanogels -- 4.3. Polymersomes -- 4.4. Nanocapsules -- 4.5. Micelles

5. Biomolecule-sensitive nanocarriers -- 5.1. Introduction -- 5.2. Adenosine-5'-triphosphate-responsive -- 5.3. Glucose-responsive -- 5.4. DNA-responsive -- 5.5. Reactive oxygen species-responsive -- 5.6. Glutathione-responsive -- 5.7. Receptor-responsive -- 5.8. Cytoplasm-responsive

6. Dual/multi-stimuli-sensitive nanocarriers -- 6.1. Introduction -- 6.2. Dual stimuli-based delivery systems -- 6.3. Triple stimuli-based delivery systems -- 7. Future perspectives and the global drug delivery systems market.

The concept of smart drug delivery vehicles involves designing and preparing a nanostructure (or microstructure) that can be loaded with a cargo. This can be a therapeutic drug, a contrast agent for imaging, or a nucleic acid for gene therapy. The nanocarrier serves to protect the cargo from degradation by enzymes in the body, to enhance the solubility of insoluble drugs, to extend the circulation half-life, and to enhance its penetration and accumulation at the target site. Importantly, smart nanocarriers can be designed to be responsive to a specific stimulus, so that the cargo is only released or activated when desired. In this volume we cover smart nanocarriers that respond to internal stimuli that are intrinsic to the target site. These stimuli are specific to the cell type, tissue or organ type, or to the disease state (cancer, infection, inflammation etc). pH-responsive nanostructures can be used for cargo release in acidic endosomal compartments, in the lower pH of tumors, and for specific oral delivery either to the stomach or intestine. Nanocarriers can be designed to be substrates of a wide-range of enzymes that are over-expressed at disease sites. Oxidation and reduction reactions can be taken advantage of in smart nanocarriers by judicious molecular design. Likewise, nanocarriers can be designed to respond to a range of specific biomolecules that may occur at the target site. In this volume we also cover dual and multi-responsive systems that combine stimuli that could be either internal or external.

Biomedical engineers.

Also available in print.

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Mahdi Karimi received his BSc in Medical Laboratory Science from the Iran University of Medical Science (IUMS), in 2005. In 2008, he gained his MSc in Medical Biotechnology from Tabriz University of Medical Science and joined the Tarbiat Modares University as a PhD student in the field of nanobiotechnology. He completed his research in 2013. During his research, in 2012, he affiliated with the laboratory of Professor Michael Hamblin in the Wellman Center for Photomedicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School as a researcher visitor, where he contributed to the design and construction of new smart nano-particles for drug/gene delivery. On completion of this study, he joined, as Assistant Professor, the Department of Medical Nanotechnology at IUMS. His current research interests include the design of smart nanoparticles in drug/gene delivery and microfluidic systems. He has established a scientific collaboration between his lab and Professor Michael Hamblin's lab to design new classes of smart nanovehicles in drug/gene delivery systems. Parham Sahandi Zangabad graduated with a BSc from Sahand University of Technology (SUT), Tabriz, Iran, in 2011. He received his MSc in Nanomaterials/Nanotechnology from Sharif University of Technology (SUT), Tehran, Iran. Concurrently, he became the research assistant at the Research Center for Nanostructured and Advanced Materials (RCNAM), SUT, Tehran, Iran. As a BSc and then MSc student he worked on the assessment of microstructural/mechanical properties of friction stir welded pure copper and friction stir processed hybrid TiO2-Al3Ti-MgO/Al nanocomposites. Furthermore, he has done several experiments on synthesis and characterization of sol-gel fabricated ceramic nanocomposite particles. The advent of innovative nanomaterials and nanotechnology interested him in interfacial sciences/technologies and also nanomedicine, including nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems and nanobiosensors. He has now joined Professor Karimi's Nanobiotechnology Research lab in the Iran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran, in association with Professor Hamblin from Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA; working on smart micro/nanocarriers applied in therapeutic agent delivery systems employed for diagnosis and therapy of various diseases and disorders such as cancers and malignancies, inflammations, infections, etc. Amir Ghasemi did his BSc at Sharif University of Technology (SUT), the most prestigious technical university in Iran. He joined the polymeric materials research group in 2012, and received his MSc in Materials Engineering from SUT. For his MSc project, he worked on thermoplastic starch (TPS)/cellulose nanofibers (CNF) biocomposites, under the supervision of Professor Bagheri. He synthesized a fully biodegradable nanocomposite, and evaluated the effects of CNF on mechanical and biodegradation of TPS. His research interests lie in the area of mechanical properties of biopolymers and polymer composites, ranging from material design to the performance of the final product. He also works on micro/nano materials, and bio-based polymers as drug carriers under the supervision of Professor Karimi and Professor Hamblin from the Harvard Medical School. He now works at Parsa Polymer Sharif, involved in thermoplastics compounding. He would like to thank Professor Karimi and Professor Hamblin for the opportunity to contribute to this work and most importantly learn about such drug delivery systems. Michael R Hamblin PhD is a principal investigator at the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, an associate professor of dermatology, Harvard Medical School and the affiliated faculty of Harvard-MIT Division of Health Science and Technology. He directs a laboratory of around 12 scientists who work in photodynamic therapy and low-level light therapy. He has published 274 peer-reviewed articles, is associate editor or eight journals and serves on NIH study sections. He has edited ten proceedings volumes, together with four other major textbooks on PDT and photomedicine. In 2011 Dr Hamblin was honored by election as a Fellow of SPIE.

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