Central Library, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi
केंद्रीय पुस्तकालय, भारतीय प्रौद्योगिकी संस्थान दिल्ली

Qualitative HCI research : going behind the scenes / Ann Blandford, Dominic Furniss, Stephann Makri.

By: Blandford, Ann [author.]Contributor(s): Furniss, Dominic [author.] | Makri, Stephann [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science | Synthesis lectures on human-centered informatics ; # 34.Publisher: San Rafael, California (1537 Fourth Street, San Rafael, CA 94901 USA) : Morgan & Claypool, 2016Description: 1 PDF (xix, 115 pages) : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: electronic Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781627057608Other title: Qualitative human-computer interaction researchSubject(s): Human-computer interaction -- Research | qualitative methods | QDA | grounded theory | Thematic Analysis | Ethnography | Observational studies | interview studiesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 004.019 LOC classification: QA76.9.H85 | B526 2016Online resources: Abstract with links to resource Also available in print.
Contents:
1. Introduction -- 1.1 An overview of qualitative approaches and methods in HCI -- 1.2 The space of interpretive qualitative studies in HCI -- 1.3 Overview of topics --
2. Planning a study -- 2.1 So, you've got this great idea or burning question -- 2.2 Planning and preparation -- 2.3 Being realistic: resources and constraints -- 2.4 Ethics and informed consent -- 2.5 Accommodating researcher biases and pre-existing theory when planning a study -- 2.6 Summary and checklist: planning a study --
3. Sampling and recruitment -- 3.1 Approaches to sampling -- 3.2 Sampling in practice: recruiting participants -- 3.3 Sampling in practice: negotiating access -- 3.4 How many participants? -- 3.5 Summary and checklist: recruiting participants --
4. Gathering data -- 4.1 The role of the researcher -- 4.2 Observation -- 4.3 Think-aloud -- 4.4 Semi-structured interviews -- 4.5 Focus groups -- 4.6 Diary studies and autoethnography -- 4.7 Working with existing sources -- 4.8 Summary and checklist: data gathering --
5. Analysing data -- 5.1 From buckets to causal narratives: different approaches to coding and analysing data -- 5.2 A pragmatic approach to analysis -- 5.3 Tools for qualitative data analysis -- 5.4 Thematic analysis -- 5.5 Illustrative example -- 5.6 Top-down approaches to analysis -- 5.7 Summary and checklist: analysing data --
6. Paradigms and strategies -- 6.1 Research paradigms -- 6.2 Research strategies -- 6.2.1 Basing a study on a particular theoretical perspective -- 6.2.2 Theory shaping analysis -- 6.2.3 Ethnomethodology -- 6.2.4 Contextual inquiry -- 6.2.5 Participant observation and action research -- 6.2.6 Grounded theory -- 6.3 Mixed methods and staged approaches -- 6.4 Responding to the situation -- 6.5 Summary and checklist: study shaping issues --
7. Reporting -- 7.1 Communicating quality through reporting -- 7.2 Summary and checklist: reporting a study --
8. Ensuring quality in qualitative research -- 8.1 Starting with the basics -- 8.2 Building quality into the process -- 8.3 External validation: inter-rater reliability, triangulation and respondent validation -- 8.4 Summary and checklist: quality of qualitative research --
9. Conclusions and further resources -- 9.1 Qualitative research: a space of possibilities -- 9.2 Further resources -- 9.3 Going behind the scenes -- Bibliography -- Authors' biographies.
Abstract: Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) addresses problems of interaction design: understanding user needs to inform design, delivering novel designs that meet user needs, and evaluating new and existing designs to determine their success in meeting user needs. Qualitative methods have an essential role to play in this enterprise, particularly in understanding user needs and behaviours and evaluating situated use of technology. Qualitative methods allow HCI researchers to ask questions where the answers are more complex and interesting than "true" or "false," and may also be unexpected. In this lecture, we draw on the analogy of making a documentary film to discuss important issues in qualitative HCI research: historically, films were presented as finished products, giving the viewer little insight into the production process; more recently, there has been a trend to go behind the scenes to expose some of the painstaking work that went into creating the final cut. Similarly, in qualitative research, the essential work behind the scenes is rarely discussed. There are many "how to" guides for particular methods, but few texts that start with the purpose of a study and then discuss the important details of how to select a suitable method, how to adapt it to fit the study context, or how to deal with unexpected challenges that arise. We address this gap by presenting a repertoire of qualitative techniques for understanding user needs, practices and experiences with technology for the purpose of informing design. We also discuss practical considerations such as tactics for recruiting participants and ways of getting started when faced with a pile of interview transcripts. Our particular focus is on semi-structured qualitative studies, which occupy a space between ethnography and surveys--typically involving observations, interviews and similar methods for data gathering, and methods of analysis based on systematic coding of data. Just as a documentary team faces challenges that often go unreported when arranging expeditions or interviews and gathering and editing footage within time and budget constraints, so the qualitative research team faces challenges in obtaining ethical clearance, recruiting participants, analysing data, choosing how and what to report, etc. We present illustrative examples drawn from prior experience to bring to life the purpose, planning and practical considerations of doing qualitative studies for interaction design. We include takeaway checklists for planning, conducting, reporting and evaluating semi-structured qualitative studies.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Star ratings
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings
Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Ebooks Ebooks Indian Institute of Technology Delhi - Central Library
Available

Mode of access: World Wide Web.

System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.

Part of: Synthesis digital library of engineering and computer science.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 101-114).

1. Introduction -- 1.1 An overview of qualitative approaches and methods in HCI -- 1.2 The space of interpretive qualitative studies in HCI -- 1.3 Overview of topics --

2. Planning a study -- 2.1 So, you've got this great idea or burning question -- 2.2 Planning and preparation -- 2.3 Being realistic: resources and constraints -- 2.4 Ethics and informed consent -- 2.5 Accommodating researcher biases and pre-existing theory when planning a study -- 2.6 Summary and checklist: planning a study --

3. Sampling and recruitment -- 3.1 Approaches to sampling -- 3.2 Sampling in practice: recruiting participants -- 3.3 Sampling in practice: negotiating access -- 3.4 How many participants? -- 3.5 Summary and checklist: recruiting participants --

4. Gathering data -- 4.1 The role of the researcher -- 4.2 Observation -- 4.3 Think-aloud -- 4.4 Semi-structured interviews -- 4.5 Focus groups -- 4.6 Diary studies and autoethnography -- 4.7 Working with existing sources -- 4.8 Summary and checklist: data gathering --

5. Analysing data -- 5.1 From buckets to causal narratives: different approaches to coding and analysing data -- 5.2 A pragmatic approach to analysis -- 5.3 Tools for qualitative data analysis -- 5.4 Thematic analysis -- 5.5 Illustrative example -- 5.6 Top-down approaches to analysis -- 5.7 Summary and checklist: analysing data --

6. Paradigms and strategies -- 6.1 Research paradigms -- 6.2 Research strategies -- 6.2.1 Basing a study on a particular theoretical perspective -- 6.2.2 Theory shaping analysis -- 6.2.3 Ethnomethodology -- 6.2.4 Contextual inquiry -- 6.2.5 Participant observation and action research -- 6.2.6 Grounded theory -- 6.3 Mixed methods and staged approaches -- 6.4 Responding to the situation -- 6.5 Summary and checklist: study shaping issues --

7. Reporting -- 7.1 Communicating quality through reporting -- 7.2 Summary and checklist: reporting a study --

8. Ensuring quality in qualitative research -- 8.1 Starting with the basics -- 8.2 Building quality into the process -- 8.3 External validation: inter-rater reliability, triangulation and respondent validation -- 8.4 Summary and checklist: quality of qualitative research --

9. Conclusions and further resources -- 9.1 Qualitative research: a space of possibilities -- 9.2 Further resources -- 9.3 Going behind the scenes -- Bibliography -- Authors' biographies.

Abstract freely available; full-text restricted to subscribers or individual document purchasers.

Compendex

INSPEC

Google scholar

Google book search

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) addresses problems of interaction design: understanding user needs to inform design, delivering novel designs that meet user needs, and evaluating new and existing designs to determine their success in meeting user needs. Qualitative methods have an essential role to play in this enterprise, particularly in understanding user needs and behaviours and evaluating situated use of technology. Qualitative methods allow HCI researchers to ask questions where the answers are more complex and interesting than "true" or "false," and may also be unexpected. In this lecture, we draw on the analogy of making a documentary film to discuss important issues in qualitative HCI research: historically, films were presented as finished products, giving the viewer little insight into the production process; more recently, there has been a trend to go behind the scenes to expose some of the painstaking work that went into creating the final cut. Similarly, in qualitative research, the essential work behind the scenes is rarely discussed. There are many "how to" guides for particular methods, but few texts that start with the purpose of a study and then discuss the important details of how to select a suitable method, how to adapt it to fit the study context, or how to deal with unexpected challenges that arise. We address this gap by presenting a repertoire of qualitative techniques for understanding user needs, practices and experiences with technology for the purpose of informing design. We also discuss practical considerations such as tactics for recruiting participants and ways of getting started when faced with a pile of interview transcripts. Our particular focus is on semi-structured qualitative studies, which occupy a space between ethnography and surveys--typically involving observations, interviews and similar methods for data gathering, and methods of analysis based on systematic coding of data. Just as a documentary team faces challenges that often go unreported when arranging expeditions or interviews and gathering and editing footage within time and budget constraints, so the qualitative research team faces challenges in obtaining ethical clearance, recruiting participants, analysing data, choosing how and what to report, etc. We present illustrative examples drawn from prior experience to bring to life the purpose, planning and practical considerations of doing qualitative studies for interaction design. We include takeaway checklists for planning, conducting, reporting and evaluating semi-structured qualitative studies.

Also available in print.

Title from PDF title page (viewed on April 16, 2016).

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.
Copyright © 2022 Central Library, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi. All Rights Reserved.

Powered by Koha